Waging Nonviolence: The Arab Spring you haven’t heard about — in Mauritania

Waging Nonviolence: The Arab Spring you haven’t heard about — in Mauritania
You may not have heard of it, but the West African country of Mauritania has what is probably one of the most vibrant and active protest movements in the world today. Protests drawing tens of thousands of people (out of a total population of just three million) take place almost weekly in the capital Nouakchott, with many smaller protests happening on a daily basis around the vast country. The protests are overwhelmingly nonviolent — even in the face of frequent violent suppression — and have been going on since February 2011. It would be comfortable to file these protests as another part of the Arab ...

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War is Boring: Africa Roundup (Congo, Mali, Mauritania, Guinea-Bissau)

War is Boring: Africa Roundup (Congo, Mali, Mauritania, Guinea-Bissau)
The latest installment of my regular Africa conflict roundup for warisboring.com Congo A large-scale mutiny-come-rebellion rocks the eastern part of the Democratic Replublic of Congo since Easter. Never the most peaceful of places, the situation in the Kivu provinces bordering Rwanda escalated, when army general Bosco “The Terminator” Ntaganda decided to defect from his position. Ntaganda is searched for by the International Criminal Court on charges of crimes against humanity. (The ICC recently sentenced Ntaganda’s former superior Thomas Lubanga in a related case.) A military commander of a powerful rebel group, the CNDP, Ntaganda protected himself from prosecution by leading an ...

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World Politics Review: The Origins and Consequences of Tuareg Nationalism

World Politics Review has brought out a new special on “peoples without borders”. They look at Kurdish, Basque and Tuareg minorities in their respective countries, and I am happy to tell you that I contributed a feature article on Tuareg nationalism for the issue: At the beginning of April, after a loose coalition of Tuareg rebel groups forced the Malian army to abandon Timbuktu, one of the armed factions involved in the fighting didn’t lose much time in announcing its ultimate objective: “We, the people of Azawad declare irrevocably the independence of the state of Azawad,”read the communiqué issued by the ...

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Voice of America: Food crisis in the Sahel

Not much happened here on the blog for some days now. That’s mostly because I was busy actually working on stuff, which will be published over the next days/weeks. First up is a short news clip for Voice of America about the Sahel food crisis, for which I researched video and story, while David Axe did production and voice: Not much happened here on the blog for some days now. That’s mostly because I was busy actually working on stuff, which will be published over the next days/weeks. First...